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Electrocution the scouge of Indian wildlife

Electrocution the scouge of Indian wildlife

Yet another tiger is electrocuted by farmers in Vidarbha trying to stop herbivores from entering their fields and eating crops.  In some districts farmers erect high voltage electric fencing around their farms to protect crops, and sometimes tigers become its victims. Sadly two tigers have met the same death this month alone.  A Forest dept. official has stated that an effort will be made to educate farmers to use solar ...

Tigress returns to its forest home after straying into a tourist resort.

Tigress returns to its forest home after straying into a tourist resort.

A tigress walked into the grounds of a tourist lodge in Karnatika last weekend probably in search food but has since returned to its forest home having been tracked by forest dept.staff on elephants. It appears that the tiger may have been attracted by a substantial number of wild boar that are present on the edge of the forest. Unfortunately waste from some lodges are not disposed of properly and just left on the ground which in turn attracts ...

Indian tiger reserve to double in size.

Indian tiger reserve to double in size.

Mudumalai tiger reserve is about to double in size with 367.59 sqkm of buffer forest land to be incorporated into its core area.  This will therefore increase the total size of the reserve to about 690 sqkm, which will allow greater movement for  tigers, leopards, hyenas and wild dogs plus herbivores such as elephants, bison and deer.  More on this good news article for tigers and other indigenous wildlife can be seen by fol ...

The Pantanal, Brazil. October 2017

The Pantanal, Brazil. October 2017

I arrived at my lodge overlooking the Cuiaba river on the 8 October. This was my third visit to The Pantanal, Brazil, a huge wetland area approximately the size of France.  The top predator here is the Jaguar, the third largest feline in the world. During my ten days here photographing wildlife, we saw ...

17 tigers lost in Madhya Pradesh in 2017

17 tigers lost in Madhya Pradesh in 2017

Statistics produced by India's National Tiger Consevation Authority (NTCA) show that at least 17 tigers have been lost this year in the once popularly known 'tiger state' of Madhya Pradesh. According  to NTCA figures over 71 tigers have been reported lost in India from the beginning of this year up until the 29 September. However in reality the figure is probably considerably higher with many tiger losses going unreported. Sadl ...

India and Nepal are co-operating on a joint tiger census

India and Nepal are co-operating on a joint tiger census

For the first time India and Nepal are shortly to carry out a joint tiger count in their respective tiger reserves and protected areas. Camera traps will be installed in tiger habitats and buffer zones which should avoid the duplication of tigers that stray between both countries.  The last tiger census in Nepal took place in 2013 when about 200 tigers were recorded.  More on this report can be found by following this link to
Another interesting article on the importance of tiger corridors.

Another interesting article on the importance of tiger corridors.

Although in recent years we have seen a modest increase in tiger numbers within India the worry that many conservationists have put forward is the lack of connectivity beween the protected areas. A good example is Ranthambhore which arguably is the most recognised tiger reserve in India and contains an estimated population of 60 tigers.  However the lack of a contiguous forest area between the reserve and its near ...

Kazakhstan to be the first country to reintroduce tigers into the wild

Kazakhstan to be the first country to reintroduce tigers into the wild

It has been reported in The Guardian that Kazakhstan is to make ready a former tiger habitat where tigers are to be reintroduced after the last tiger was lost some 70 years ago.  Tigers will be introduced into an arra known as Ili-Balkhash which forms part of the tigers former historical range.  Much work needs to be carried out before the first tigers arrive ...

Possibly more tigers for Cambodia

Possibly more tigers for Cambodia

A joint effort between the Cambodian goverment and a group of non government organisations are discussing the possibilty of increasing the numbers of wild tigers in the northeastern region of Cambodia.  By increasing tiger numbers and therefore greater tourist numbers to the region local people would benefit from the income produced as can be seen from other countires that have developed tourism on the back of tiger conservation ...

The tragedy and blessing of the severe floods at Kaziranga

The tragedy and blessing of the severe floods at Kaziranga

Over 300 animals have drowned so far after the second wave of floods hit Kaziranga. Flooding each year as the the mighty Bramaputra river rises during the monsoon period brings huge benefits to the eco system of the park allowing the grass plains to thrive which in turn provides food for the large herbivore popultion. However at the same time many of its animals cannot escape the rising ...

Why forest connectivity is essential in reducing human/tiger conflict.

Why forest connectivity is essential in reducing human/tiger conflict.

In the past 3 months 6 human deaths have been reported at Pilibhit.  In 2014 Pilibhit was declared a tiger reserve and this helped create a sucess story for tiger conservation with the big cat population increasing from 28 to about 50. However at Pilibhit and a small number of other tiger reserves a common denominator can be recognised as the main causes of human injury and deaths.  As an example at Pilibhit villagers are grow ...